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Thread: Administration is shutting down the last lead smelting plant in the US

  1. #21

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    For me it's hard to believe it's the gun enthusiasts. I don't know what the problem is, but not getting .22s, limitation on 9mm, and everything else up 50%, 100% or more, points to something bigger out of order. If the closing lead smelter is the only one in the US it will exacerbate the shortage. It may be right for the public for that plant to close, if in fact, they are poisoning their community, but again that is something I cannot know with the limited information available. The important thing for the moment is that anti gun forces will use whatever tools are at their disposal to advance the disarmament of the population. Ammunition is certainly the back door to those ends. Many of the members of this forum have gun related businesses. I am guessing they are feeling the pinch. You can't teach classes if students can't get ammunition. I recently took a terrific class and the instructor, himself, ran out. You can't even run Ruger rimfire matches with such limitation on 22lr. 22's, I can't believe they are not available. It would have been hard to dream such a bad dream just a few years ago. The only positives I've seen lately is .556 prices dropping and slightly more availability of 9mm. We continue to walk on egg shells waiting for the next shoe to fall. Will it be the smelter closing?
    “There are two ways to slide easily through life: to believe everything or to doubt everything; both ways save us from thinking.”

  2. #22
    J. Boyette, rimfire basically an imported item, and limited by customs through exec order. That is the first believable reason for the shortage I've heard.
    “There are two ways to slide easily through life: to believe everything or to doubt everything; both ways save us from thinking.”

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by edhaus View Post
    J. Boyette, rimfire basically an imported item, and limited by customs through exec order. That is the first believable reason for the shortage I've heard.
    Its true.

    John
    John Boyette
    Chief Compliance Officer
    War Sport Ind .LLC

    Owner and Instructor
    Trace Armory Group .LLC
    919-428-5265

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by J.Boyette View Post
    Its true.

    John
    Obama doesn't want you to plink. That about sums it up.
    So we’ll live,
    And pray, and sing, and tell old tales, and laugh
    At guilded butterflies

  5. #25
    More then that I feel. The American masses are retarded and have no idea how much stuff comes in ports. It's easy to regulate imports over US made products.

    Staying with this topic, how many lead projectiles are made stateside then imports? This is part of the issue too. Stop non-critical imports at the port and stuff is not made.

    John
    John Boyette
    Chief Compliance Officer
    War Sport Ind .LLC

    Owner and Instructor
    Trace Armory Group .LLC
    919-428-5265

  6. #26
    The manager at Gander Mtn said that they can legally hold stuff at the ports for 3 years without any paperwork. They had just uncrated a bunch of Mosins that had been sitting on the docks for that long.
    I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast; for I intend to go in harm's way.

    John Paul Jones


    On 1 November 1777, he sailed for France in Ranger, carrying dispatches for the American commissioner and word of Burgoyne's surrender at Saratoga. Admiral La Motte Piquet returned Jones' salute at Quiberon Bay, France, 14 February 1778—the first time the new "stars and stripes" were recognized by a foreign power.

  7. #27
    It would be hard for me to believe that closing of one lead smelting plant is going to affect ammunition prices or availability in a significant manner.

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by HellTeeOne View Post
    It would be hard for me to believe that closing of one lead smelting plant is going to affect ammunition prices or availability in a significant manner.
    even if its the last one in the country?
    I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast; for I intend to go in harm's way.

    John Paul Jones


    On 1 November 1777, he sailed for France in Ranger, carrying dispatches for the American commissioner and word of Burgoyne's surrender at Saratoga. Admiral La Motte Piquet returned Jones' salute at Quiberon Bay, France, 14 February 1778—the first time the new "stars and stripes" were recognized by a foreign power.

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by soreshoulder View Post
    The manager at Gander Mtn said that they can legally hold stuff at the ports for 3 years without any paperwork. They had just uncrated a bunch of Mosins that had been sitting on the docks for that long.
    Wonder how much ammo, firearms, etc are ruined by corrosion sitting near salt water ports in a 3yr hold pattern.

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by soreshoulder View Post
    even if its the last one in the country?
    peep that article from Sierra

  11. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by SonOfRay View Post
    peep that article from Sierra
    Ok, Sierra gets their recycled lead from car batteries. What about everyone else??

    Just because one specialty bullet manufacturer does it that way doesn't mean the entire market won't be affected.

  12. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by 11B3XCIB View Post
    Ok, Sierra gets their recycled lead from car batteries. What about everyone else??

    Just because one specialty bullet manufacturer does it that way doesn't mean the entire market won't be affected.
    Silence! Sierra has spoken!
    So we’ll live,
    And pray, and sing, and tell old tales, and laugh
    At guilded butterflies

  13. #33
    Some people seem to have forgotten the laws of supply and demand. If the last factory that refines ore in to lead in this country has shut down that means that the supply of lead is limited until a new supply is found. That means that everything that is made with lead is now going to complete for the limited supply and the prices of the product will go up. It is not just bullets that are going to cost more but you can bet the price of automobile batteries are about to go way up as well.

  14. #34

  15. #35
    It really is a pretty simple concept. Up until now, someone who doesn't normally compete with Sierra for raw materials is now out of a primary supplier of lead, so they are going to look at Sierra's supplier eventually.

    These are finite resources, and its a great illustration of why the single source/ just-in-time stuff is stoooooopid

    smelting lead might be the easiest process on Earth, but getting a permit for it from the Obama EPA is probably not quite as easy. Ask the coal miners in West Virginia how its working out for them.
    I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast; for I intend to go in harm's way.

    John Paul Jones


    On 1 November 1777, he sailed for France in Ranger, carrying dispatches for the American commissioner and word of Burgoyne's surrender at Saratoga. Admiral La Motte Piquet returned Jones' salute at Quiberon Bay, France, 14 February 1778—the first time the new "stars and stripes" were recognized by a foreign power.

  16. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by soreshoulder View Post
    It really is a pretty simple concept. Up until now, someone who doesn't normally compete with Sierra for raw materials is now out of a primary supplier of lead, so they are going to look at Sierra's supplier eventually.

    These are finite resources, and its a great illustration of why the single source/ just-in-time stuff is stoooooopid

    smelting lead might be the easiest process on Earth, but getting a permit for it from the Obama EPA is probably not quite as easy. Ask the coal miners in West Virginia how its working out for them.
    Silence! Sierra has spoken! Nothing to see here!
    So we’ll live,
    And pray, and sing, and tell old tales, and laugh
    At guilded butterflies

  17. #37
    I guess part of it is you have to figure out how much lead they were actually producing to begin with. Only figures I can find are from 2005 and then 2006. 2005 production levels were 376,200 metric tons. or just under 12% global production. However the very next year their production was only 140,300 metric tons of primary lead. (which was about 40k metric tons under what they were allowed to pull out of the ground.) Which was before they were required to drop production due to them severely polluting the entire area.

    I just don't think that they were producing lead in enough quantities to cause any real disaster as far as bullet supply is concerned in all honesty.

    Also don't forget that around 90% of us lead consumption is for lead batteries, with the remaining 10% for all other uses combined. Compared to the other uses, bullets just ain't all that large of a player in the demand structure. Especially since a good many people buy cheap Russian made ammo now anyway.
    When you have the wolf by the ears, sometimes it is just as hard to let go, as hold on.

    Against the famine and the crown, I rebelled, they cut me down, now you must raise a child with dignity.

  18. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by B00GER View Post
    Silence! Sierra has spoken! Nothing to see here!
    i know they arent speaking for all, but I think its a good representation of the market

    I think many will be pleasantly surprised when the prices dont shoot up through the roof

  19. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by SonOfRay View Post
    i know they arent speaking for all, but I think its a good representation of the market

    I think many will be pleasantly surprised when the prices dont shoot up through the roof
    However, I don't want to be caught wanting if prices DO shoot through the roof and/or supply dwindles. Ask the people short on .22 Long Rifle how they feel about being caught unprepared. Here we have what could be construed as a very obvious "get it while you can". I intend to do just that until the Bank of Wife shuts me down. If nothing happens, great, I'll have reloading supplies to spare. If prices go up and supply down; same outcome.

  20. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by 11B3XCIB View Post
    However, I don't want to be caught wanting if prices DO shoot through the roof and/or supply dwindles. Ask the people short on .22 Long Rifle how they feel about being caught unprepared. Here we have what could be construed as a very obvious "get it while you can". I intend to do just that until the Bank of Wife shuts me down. If nothing happens, great, I'll have reloading supplies to spare. If prices go up and supply down; same outcome.
    what if that was O's plan....cause a panic, get money flowing into the economy, out of the savings accounts..... just saying, its smart

    Personally, I'll stick to what I do now - a little here a little there, no rush

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