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Thread: RockOla M14F

  1. #1

    RockOla M14F


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    Ok...finally got everything together.....think I'm going to run it like this for a while..

    Bolts is lapped...rear sight issue is fixed and headspace set to 1.633.






  2. #2
    That's beautiful man

  3. #3
    Give ya $800 bucks for it.

    Very nice, Merry Christmas
    "Tolerance is the virtue of the man without convictions." ~Gilbert K. Chesterton]

  4. #4
    Not Subscribed Senior Member
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    Very nice. How does this receiver compare to a LRB, in your opinion?

  5. #5
    Wow, this caused me to research Rock-Ola a bit and found some interesting stuff. What's just as interesting is the lack of mention of any M-14 production. Was this a limited run?

    -Some history of Rock-Ola:

    "The Rock-Ola Manufacturing Corporation was, along with Wurlitzer, a top maker of jukeboxes. The company, which originally made slot machines, scales and pinball machines, was founded in 1927 by Coin-Op pioneer David Cullen Rockola.

    During the 1920s, Rockola was linked with Chicago organized crime and escaped a jail sentence by turning State's Evidence. Starting in 1935, Rock-Ola sold more than 400,000 jukeboxes under the Rock-Ola brand name, which predated the rock and roll era by two decades, and is thought to have inspired the term. In 1977, The Antique Apparatus Company engineered, refined, and manufactured the first and finest "Nostalgic" Jukeboxes. The Antique Apparatus Company acquired the Rock-Ola Corporation and name in 1992.

    Rock-Ola became a prime contractor for production of the M1 carbine for the US Military during World War II. Rock-Ola machined receivers, barrels, bolts, firing pins, extractors, triggers, trigger housings, sears, operating slides, gas cylinders, and recoil plates. Rock-Ola used its furniture machinery to manufacture stocks and handguards for its own production and for other prime contractors, and subcontracted production of other machined parts. Rock-Ola delivered 228,500 military carbines at $58 each before contracts were cancelled on 31 May 1944. Rock-Ola also produced approximately sixty "presentation" carbines as gifts to company executives and other officials. Presentation carbines were finished in polished blue rather than the dull Parkerizing used on military weapons, and were accompanied by a custom-made wooden case including the name of the recipient engraved on a brass plate. Some of the presentation carbines had no serial numbers, while others were numbered in a special sequence preceded by "EX". Military production carbines had serial numbers in the following range:
    1,662,250 - 1,762,519
    4,532,100 - 4,632,099
    6,071,189 - 6,099,688
    6,199,684 - 6,219,688
    Last edited by georgel; 12-25-2013 at 10:17 PM.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by georgel View Post
    Wow, this caused me to research Rock-Ola a bit and found some interesting stuff. What's just as interesting is the lack of mention of any M-14 production. Was this a limited run?

    -Some history of Rock-Ola:

    "The Rock-Ola Manufacturing Corporation was, along with Wurlitzer, a top maker of jukeboxes. The company, which originally made slot machines, scales and pinball machines, was founded in 1927 by Coin-Op pioneer David Cullen Rockola.

    During the 1920s, Rockola was linked with Chicago organized crime and escaped a jail sentence by turning State's Evidence. Starting in 1935, Rock-Ola sold more than 400,000 jukeboxes under the Rock-Ola brand name, which predated the rock and roll era by two decades, and is thought to have inspired the term. In 1977, The Antique Apparatus Company engineered, refined, and manufactured the first and finest "Nostalgic" Jukeboxes. The Antique Apparatus Company acquired the Rock-Ola Corporation and name in 1992.

    Rock-Ola became a prime contractor for production of the M1 carbine for the US Military during World War II. Rock-Ola machined receivers, barrels, bolts, firing pins, extractors, triggers, trigger housings, sears, operating slides, gas cylinders, and recoil plates. Rock-Ola used its furniture machinery to manufacture stocks and handguards for its own production and for other prime contractors, and subcontracted production of other machined parts. Rock-Ola delivered 228,500 military carbines at $58 each before contracts were cancelled on 31 May 1944. Rock-Ola also produced approximately sixty "presentation" carbines as gifts to company executives and other officials. Presentation carbines were finished in polished blue rather than the dull Parkerizing used on military weapons, and were accompanied by a custom-made wooden case including the name of the recipient engraved on a brass plate. Some of the presentation carbines had no serial numbers, while others were numbered in a special sequence preceded by "EX". Military production carbines had serial numbers in the following range:
    1,662,250 - 1,762,519
    4,532,100 - 4,632,099
    6,071,189 - 6,099,688
    6,199,684 - 6,219,688
    It should be a James River armory "Rock-ola" co-operation for these new made recievers, I was drooling over them a few days ago. http://www.jamesriverarmory.com/rockola-m-14.html
    Esse Quam Videri
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  7. #7
    Yes it's the James River Armory..apparently they have the "rights" to the "rock-ola" name.

    Can't compare it to an LRB as I don't have one. I did compare it to a 7.62mm Firearms receiver as I also have one of those. From what I understand both 7.62 and JRA (James River Armory) receivers are made by Bula forge....same steel ..same machines same tooling etc... HOWEVER..7.62 and JRA both have their OWN "different" CNC programing so there are minor differences in the final product.

    My 7.62 I bought 2nd hand and had to send it back for replacement...my replacement one was much better than the first and required some minor tweaking to get it to run...I'm currently using a 7.62 made bolt in it as a USGI bolt didn't fit without some work. It has a Criterion non-chrome barrel in it.

    The JRA went together a little easier..had good draw on the barrel...probably should have turned a hair off the shoulder but it was so close I just torqued it over that last 2 degrees. Barrel was a used std wgt NM barrel and with several USGI bolts (new and used) would not pass .308 GO. I lapped in the best fitting bolt to get good lug contact but could just "barely" get a GO gage to pass. So I reamed the barrel to 1.633 which is .001 under 7.62 nato GO so all my NATO ammo will now chamber as well. Had to chamfer the hole for the windage knob so the knob would fully seat. This was a missed step in the machining and my 7.62 had the same issue but I had a worn knob that masked it on the 7.62 rifle. JRA has stated this step will be added to the programming and receivers with it will be modified in shop. It's not a big deal...couple of turns with my carbide crowning tool fixed it.

    Overall the amount of work to build one was minimal...ALL commercial M1A/M14 type rifles need SOME tweaking when assembling and the JRA went together just fine with no headaches. The 7.62 was more difficult and I'm stuck with using one of their bolts in it for now as the barrel ring spec is slightly shorter than spec causing less clearance for the bolt. However in 7.62s defense they have a lifetime warranty (as does JRA) so if I end up having issues with receiver I expect they will take care of it....also my 7.62 is a GEN 3 and they now have a "GEN 4" out.

    So in summary :
    7.62 has a spotty start with hit or miss QC with receivers below ser 522XX however if you got a "good one" then you likely won't have any issues with it.
    JRA has a great start up (IMHO by seeing what 7.62 did right and wrong and fixing it...nothing wrong with that) to my knowledge none of the first 200 JRA receivers have been returned for any sort of defects.

    I haven't shot either of my rifles enough to make a report. The 7.62 has a Criterion and the JRA has my old USGI NM barrel on it..so off the bat the JRA has the lead but I will not compare them apples to apples as they are not the same.

    Will try and get some family pics up later...

  8. #8
    That is a damn fine looking weapon, I have never seen an M14 with the pistol grip stock before and it looks awesome, the M14 in wood is one of my bucket list guns followed by the M1 Garand, heck I would love to have a collection of all of the US issued weapons but my bank account is holding me back a bit.

  9. #9
    Glad to see someone else here with one. I got a factory built gun with a 2-digit serial number. It is a very nice build and a great shooter. Did you get one of the 2-digit receivers? They reportedly had a minor issue with barrel draw on the early receivers that was corrected by SN 150 or so.

    James River appears to be doing everything right in their start-up with M14s. They say they have the closest one to GI on the market. From what I've seen, this is probably true. I spent about half an hour talking to the owner of the company. Seems to be a really nice guy and interested in doing things right. Makes me want to take a harder look at their AKs in the future, as well.

    Also, they plan on moving their operation to NC this year.

  10. #10
    Good to see you Cubrock...I think we've been haunting the same forums for quite a while now...think I even bought a mosin or two off you many moons ago...

    No mine is 14X. Haven't shot it but 10 rounds for function so far...maybe tomorrow I'll get out and shoot it...

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremy2171 View Post
    Good to see you Cubrock...I think we've been haunting the same forums for quite a while now...think I even bought a mosin or two off you many moons ago...

    No mine is 14X. Haven't shot it but 10 rounds for function so far...maybe tomorrow I'll get out and shoot it...

    Yep. I wondered if that was you, but couldn't tell from your avatar pic. There is a gun in the way.

    I'll let you know next time I am out that way. Would love to chat, maybe compare notes on our receivers. Mine is # 37 (no use hiding the number, as it is already posted elsewhere in a pictorial review of a Rock-Ola build). I got it by dumb luck from Atlantic Firearms. It has an LRB bolt and LRB-marked Criterion barrel in it. James River told me that is correct for their first run of builds, as they were getting parts from LRB at that point while waiting for their own parts to come in. I know a GI barrel is cooler, but I haven't noticed a performance disadvantage to the Criterion.





  12. #12
    I really need one of these...
    Most of my money I spent on guns, tractors, women and beer. The rest I just wasted...

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Don View Post
    I really need one of these...

    They are currently running an introductory special - $1995 plus shipping for a fully built gun. They told me their prices will be going up in January. They have a carbine version and a service rifle version. When I talked to them, they had carbines in stock and non-chrome-lined barreled rifles in stock. If you want a chrome-lined barrel on a rifle, you will have to wait until the barrels come in, maybe as late as March.

    Anywho, they didn't say what the price increase would be, but I think it was at least $300, which still puts them a few hundred cheaper than LRB.

  14. #14
    M14? Where's the HAPPY switch?
    Do you like the E-2 stock? Had one on an issue M14 in the late 60's, made a better club than a stock IMHO. It was ok for prone position use but other than that,, Meh, didn't care for it.

  15. #15
    Rest of the family......



    top down:
    SA Inc with a bobbed to 18.5" chicom barrel
    7.62mm Firearms M14
    M114 Springchester welded M1 rec and chicom M14 front end. 7.62 Garand enblocs instead of mags..
    Last edited by Jeremy2171; 01-05-2014 at 10:02 AM.
    Semper Fi!
    USMC Ret
    Armorer Extraordinaire

  16. #16
    M114 Springchester welded M1 rec and chicom M14 front end. 7.62 Garand enblocs instead of mags..
    Interesting. Did this keep all of the Garand's internals since you're still using the clips? Any issues with a short op-rod operating a long action?

  17. #17

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by cuervo View Post
    Interesting. Did this keep all of the Garand's internals since you're still using the clips? Any issues with a short op-rod operating a long action?
    No the unserviceable M1 oprod was shortened to M14 length then the M14 oprod guide was sleeved to accept the thinner M1 rod. End of rod was capped with a bolt welded in and ground to fit. Use the oprod spring from a "tanker" garand and thats it. Barrel forward is M14...receiver back is M1. Runs pretty good...haven't shot it in a while though....
    Semper Fi!
    USMC Ret
    Armorer Extraordinaire

  19. #19
    Just a question, but why would one buy one of them and not just a normal Springfield Inc ?

    JRA has been around for years and known for sub par work on their black powder guns they were building, so they picked a new line to build.

    I have several of the Springfield INC and they are top of the line, a few have a lot of TRW parts.
    Paid lots less for a NM M1a. What do I not see, other then the GI wood is very cool.

    I feel Springfield will be around for years to come, not the same for people that have been trying to get repair work on JRA guns in the black powder shooting lines.
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  20. #20
    I have no knowledge of any issues with the JRA black powder stuff.

    SA Inc have a cast receiver and many parts on their rifles are REPO.

    The JRA is forged. I already have a SA Inc rifle and a 7.62mm Firearms rifle...since I still had a pile of parts and JRA had a black Friday special I got a receiver from them...and put all my stuff on it. It went together well.

    If JRA can deliver a good product for the long term then M14 type rifles can be had for cheaper if there are more makers.... JMHO...
    Semper Fi!
    USMC Ret
    Armorer Extraordinaire

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