Arisaka (Type 99)

Discussion in 'Curio & Relics' started by NCTiger, Aug 5, 2016.

  1. NCTiger

    NCTiger Staff Member Staff Member

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    Another milsurp wandered into my hands. The question is, is it worth the trouble to repair back to original shooting condition? Mum has been ground-off, front sight is bent, Bolt is missing firing pin, firing pin spring and safety/end cap. On the plus side: it does have Anti-Aircraft rear sight. It is my belief the stock is not cracked. It appears to be a factory splice. I would appreciate any thoughts?

    The rifle was passed on to me by a friend of a friend for me to clean and estimate repair cost. I have found a complete bolt for $130, not sure if individual parts are available. If its worth fixing, I may make her an offer. I would appreciate any thoughts or ideas.

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    Last edited: Aug 7, 2016
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  2. East of Here

    East of Here Registered Member

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    It appears to be a 1st Series Nagoya and the butt splice is 'factory original'. It is a good rifle and should be a nice shooter once restored. Does the serial number on the bolt body match the last 3 numbers of the serial number on the rifle? Also, are the screws on the rifle still staked?

    The only issue with restoring is that these rifles just don't command a premium on the milsurp market and they seem to sell between $200 - $300 from what I've seen lately. So unless you can pick it up for $150 - $170, you are going to be upside down in it after dropping $130 for the other bolt (which seems to be a pretty good price on a complete T99 bolt). I have 2 type 99's and I like shooting them more than a lot of my other milsurps. They are very underrated rifles.
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2016
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  3. NCTiger

    NCTiger Staff Member Staff Member

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    Thank you for responding and providing helpful information. Sadly, the numbers do not match. And yes the screws have been staked, but it is apparent that they have been removed and possibly replaced with correct screws. I say this because the stake marks are visible on the metal along side the screws, but the current screws are undamaged.
     
  4. East of Here

    East of Here Registered Member

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    It is not at all uncommon for the bolt not to match. Apparently, when the soldiers were coming back from Japan with these rifles as souvenirs, most (of not all) of the transport ships would require the soldiers to pull the bolt and throw it in a barrel or bucket beside the gangway when they came on board to ensure that nobody could pop off a round shipboard. Then, the soldiers would just reach in and grab a bolt out of the barrel or bucket beside the gangway as they left the ship in the US. But if the bolt does match, it will add a slight bump in value.

    I think that rifle is a good candidate for replacing the bolt and straightening the front sight ears and returning it to shooting condition. They really are great shooters. However, if I were making an offer to buy the rifle, I don't think I would go over $100 - $120, considering that it is going to cost $130 to replace the bolt, unless you want to be patient and hunt for cheaper individual parts off ebay or gun shows. It would not bother me to have $200-$250 in it when it is done, but that amount would also be about full retail for it.

    As an aside, I took my 31st series Toyo Kogyo type 99 out to the range today and put 5 rounds through it and hit the 300 yard plate all 5 times. It is very accurate. I took it out today because the Toyo Kogyo arsenal was located in Hiroshima and today was the 71st anniversary of that arsenal ceasing production due to the atomic bomb being dropped that day. The funny thing is, the arsenal was built in a small valley, so it actually survived the blast. However, it ceased rifle production and the building was converted to a hospital for all the victims of the atomic bomb. The company itself, Toyo Kogyo Ltd., also survived the war and is still in business today; but it no longer makes rifles and it operates under a different name. It is now known as the Mazda Motor Corporation.

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  5. NCTiger

    NCTiger Staff Member Staff Member

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    Sorry it has taken me so long to respond. That is a sweet rifle.

    Given all the issues this rifle has, I probably should pass on making the owner an offer; however she can really use the money and the Arisaka will make for a nice project.
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2016

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