School me on O/Us

Discussion in 'Shotgun Forum' started by Braveheart, Jul 20, 2016.

  1. GTM1

    GTM1 Registered Member

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    For what you are wanting to do....
    Remington 1100/28'' bbl/Imp choke.
    After shooting clays for a while and you really like it ,then spend the extra cash on a good OU and keep the Remmy for the field. ;)
    Just my $.02
     
  2. Larry Kool

    Larry Kool Registered Member

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    My buddy has a Ruger Red Label in 20 Gauge. It functions well but, it's too light for clays (even though he uses it for that purpose). I ran two boxes through that Ruger and had a wicked bruise on my shoulder.
     
  3. dmarbell

    dmarbell Behold...the "Mallet O' Understanding..."

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    ^^^^^^^^^^^
    This.

    ^^^^^^^^^^^^
    And this.

    It's hard to pick one single shotgun from advice and the prejudices that go with it, without actually shooting the guns some. Try before you buy, if at all possible. For example, the Browning Crossover Target is a fine shotgun for the money, and will last a long time. But it has a high-post rib that adapts well for trap and skeet, as well as clays. It might take some getting used to, if you're not familiar with relatively high-shooting trap-style guns. Beretta Silver Pigeon I (one) will be hard to beat for the price. The Schnabel forend gives me trouble with my front hand hold, but that's just me.

    I could drone on and on. But also, don't be afraid to buy a used gun. There are many, many guns bought with the best of intentions and then rarely shot. A used Silver Pigeon can save you 25% or so over a new priced gun, and might have a few cases of shells through a gun designed to be shot 100,00+ rounds. A used Browning 725 (the newest design, and low-profile receiver like the Cynergy) might could be found for around $2k. Used Browning sporting guns, with designations 325, 425, 525 and 625 can be found in that price range. (Are you seeing a pattern to the naming of guns? Just like drivers in golf, they need constant new gun sales.) Some Browning fans I've talked with think the Browning 525 is the best sporting gun they ever made.

    Now for my prejudice. I believe the absolute best value for the money is the Winchester Select Energy. Though extremely hard to find now, they can be bought new for $1,600 +/- and maybe $1,200 used. They were made by Fabrique Nationale in Belgium, and assembled in Portugal. Brownings were manufactured by FN until the mid-1970s, and then production was moved to Miroku, Japan. The Belgium Brownings were considered superior in quality, and are somewhat prized now on the used market. The Win SE quality seems to be comparable.

    Welcome to the madness!
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2016
  4. CharlieNC

    CharlieNC Registered Member

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    I own an older Red Label which is well made and shoots well. Also an old Browning SxS, and an old Rem1100 which has never failed to perform. I've also shot friends higher end OU. For our annual pheasant hunt I decided to try a lightweight 20ga. Not knowing if it would perform adequately on the tough late season birds, I did not want to spend much in case it didn't work out. Ended up getting a Stevens 555 which weighs approx 5.5lbs. Shot 125 rounds of sporting clays in a light shirt; it shot well and the recoil was not noticeable compared to my heavier 12ga. On the pheasant hunt it was deadly using 3" shells, which again surprisingly had less recoil that the high velocity 12ga I has used before. The 555 is a lower end shotgun, but like the others it fits me well and therefore shoots great with less felt recoil. The most expensive shotgun I ever used beat me up bigtime; you guessed it, it did not fit well. This is also why I got a Red Label instead of a Citori, it fits. In my opinion this is the most important factor you should consider.
     
  5. Larry Kool

    Larry Kool Registered Member

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    Along these lines, I elected to get a Remy 11-87 to fill this bill. I made this choice because gas operated shotguns have less kick than O/U's, given the same weight The 11-87 does a great job of mitigating the recoil and I rarely have a sore shoulder afterwards. Additionally, They are far more useful, since it can double as both a field and trap gun and it holds more rounds. If you later decide that you wish to get a dedicated clays shotgun, then purchase a good O/U.
     

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