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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
While we've always allowed AKs, and other non-AR carbines, in our Basic and Defensive Carbine classes, we have a number of people that ask about using an AK or DCNC teaching an AK specific class. We did one last year that was pretty popular and we're wanting to know if theres enough interest to do another one this year.

Any takers?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I would consider one of these. Will look at your site to get a feel on what's involved. Where are these usually held?
the class would most likely be held in Carthage or Albemarle, NC.

Here's a review of the last one

originally wirtten by Jeff Franz

Basic Kalashnikov
Date: 30 April 2011
Location: Troutman, NC
Instructors: Chris Clifton and Steve Hawley, Defensive Concepts NC

Most of the courses I choose to attend have some relevance to my own self defense goals and preparedness. This class, however, was attended more out of curiosity and enjoyment than preparation for a defensive shooting encounter. Because my rifle of choice for home defense is an AR, there is little chance I would ever use an AK in a dire situation. I do not hold delusions of picking up an AK on some battlefield in an apocalyptic scenario. Because I enjoy shooting and endeavor to learn as much as I can about the subject, I chose to once again entrust the guys at Defensive Concepts NC to help me develop my skills as a shooter. As expected, I was not disappointed.

The class attendees were a good mix of active duty military (deploying in July and potentially in need of the ability to run a battle field pickup effectively and efficiently), law enforcement, and civilians. After introductions and a safety brief, we proned out on the dew-soaked morning grass to zero or confirm zero on our rifles. Chris and Steve advocate the use of the 100 yard BZO, and we began at 25 yards to make sure we were on paper before venturing further down the range. We adjusted windage to ensure we were in the center of the target, and adjusted elevation to print about an inch and a half low at 25 yards, which should yield a 100 yard zero. Once everyone was hitting the mark at 25, we backed up to 100 yards to confirm. This is where the wheels came off of the bargain basement AK I purchased. I was assured by the salesman that all AK's will run like a scalded dog no matter what, and though I know better based on my experience with AR's and handguns, I took his word for it and took the cheap way out. Thankfully, Steve had brought an extra AK with him that allowed me to finish the course. Mine is heading back to the manufacturer to be made right, and then hitting the market. I will undoubtedly lose money selling it, and would have been better off buying quality the first time.

Once zeros were confirmed, we moved on to a marksmanship work at the 15 yard line. As with every other DCNC class, accuracy is king, and speed comes secondary. Everyone in the class already possessed a decent grasp of marksmanship fundamentals, so after a refresher and lunch, we were able to focus on what makes the AK different from the AR. Marksmanship fundamentals do not change between rifle platforms. Generally, grip and stance are the same, and trigger control, sight alignment and sight picture don't change. The manual of arms changes when reloading or clearing malfunctions with the AK, and the ergonomics of the rifle in general are different and take some getting used to. Chris and Steve did an excellent job of presenting multiple ways of accomplishing various tasks, such as removing an expended magazine, manipulating the charging handle, or clearing malfunctions. We then spent ample time practicing each of the ways, and then put them on the shot timer to see what was faster and more efficient, all while maintaining strict accuracy standards.

Conclusions

Though I have been exposed to the platform before, I certainly came away with a more thorough understanding of the AK and how to run it hard. The theory that you can't run an AK like an AR is pure BS. I will say that manipulating an AK is harder than an AR, and takes practice to become proficient at it, but the principals are all the same. While I understand the AK is heralded for its reliability, simplicity, low price tag, and caliber, its ergonomics leave much to be desired. Manipulating the safety alone provides challenges on an unmodified gun. Don't run an AK without gloves. I learned this the hard way. Hand guards become very hot, and there are hungry sharp edges looking to take a bit out of your skin everywhere. The wooden foreends with built in vertical grips, known by a less PG-rated name referring to a part of a donkey's anatomy, are comfortable to shoot, but make magazine changes and malfunction clearing a bitch.

My thanks to Chris and Steve for once again conducting an informative and enjoyable course at a very affordable price. I look forward to training with them again the near future. I know I sound like a broken record, but if you are a gun owner, there are worse things you can do than spend the time and effort to train with these guys. You will improve your skill set, guaranteed.

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