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Are ya' hungry, Son?!
 

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Mmmmm, looks great and cooked to perfection. Went over to Fountain Hill (218 just into Anson co.) to the BBQ Barn (literally a converted chickenhouse and very nicely done) for a party Saturday evening. If you are local you might like to visit them. Great country/neighborly atmosphere.
 

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I actually got turned on looking at .;cheers
 

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I have a question about the cut of meat used. I ran across a recipe that called for a brisket cut that still had the layer of fat on it. The person who wrote the article called it a "packers cut" and that the fat left on it was called the deckle(?). The point being that a low and slow cook of this meat with the fat layer still left on it was the key to a moist and flavorful brisket.

I don't think I've ever seen this cut and wanted to know if anyone was familiar with it and where it could be purchased.

PS: the above photos should be outlawed under the Geneva covenants.:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I put yellow mustard all over both brisket and butt. Add the rub:
1 C light brown sugar
3 tablespoons chili powder
2 tablespoons dry mustard
2 tablespoons garlic power
2 tablespoons cayenne pepper
2 tablespoons Kosher salt
2 tablespoons fresh cracked black pepper
1 teaspoon celery salt

Inject with beef broth/apple juice mixture (only on brisket)
Double wrap in plastic wrap overnight or at least 8 hours

A billion ways to do it, but found this works for me
 

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Check with Walmart, BJ's, or just speaking with the butcher at your local grocery store.

I have a question about the cut of meat used. I ran across a recipe that called for a brisket cut that still had the layer of fat on it. The person who wrote the article called it a "packers cut" and that the fat left on it was called the deckle(?). The point being that a low and slow cook of this meat with the fat layer still left on it was the key to a moist and flavorful brisket.

I don't think I've ever seen this cut and wanted to know if anyone was familiar with it and where it could be purchased.

PS: the above photos should be outlawed under the Geneva covenants.:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I have a question about the cut of meat used. I ran across a recipe that called for a brisket cut that still had the layer of fat on it. The person who wrote the article called it a "packers cut" and that the fat left on it was called the deckle(?). The point being that a low and slow cook of this meat with the fat layer still left on it was the key to a moist and flavorful brisket.

I don't think I've ever seen this cut and wanted to know if anyone was familiar with it and where it could be purchased.

PS: the above photos should be outlawed under the Geneva covenants.:D
The one I used was a flat. I waited until the last minute and the place I get them from was all out of what I normally get. I usually leave a 1/4 inch on the brisket because it's so easy to dry out. The deckle is the fatty part, but does have some meat running through it and is used for burnt ends. So you are correct as far as I know, the packer contains the flat and deckle or whole brisket. If you have a Sams or BJs, they usually have a few. Depending on the supply, you might only find a flat like I did. Either way, they turn out about the same for me. Hope that helps.
 

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I have a question about the cut of meat used. I ran across a recipe that called for a brisket cut that still had the layer of fat on it. The person who wrote the article called it a "packers cut" and that the fat left on it was called the deckle(?). The point being that a low and slow cook of this meat with the fat layer still left on it was the key to a moist and flavorful brisket.

I don't think I've ever seen this cut and wanted to know if anyone was familiar with it and where it could be purchased.

PS: the above photos should be outlawed under the Geneva covenants.:D
The one I used was a flat. I waited until the last minute and the place I get them from was all out of what I normally get. I usually leave a 1/4 inch on the brisket because it's so easy to dry out. The deckle is the fatty part, but does have some meat running through it and is used for burnt ends. So you are correct as far as I know, the packer contains the flat and deckle or whole brisket. If you have a Sams or BJs, they usually have a few. Depending on the supply, you might only find a flat like I did. Either way, they turn out about the same for me. Hope that helps.
You're not going to find a true "Packer's Cut" around here because most of the stores get in what is called "box beef" (or "boxed beef") rather than cutting their own and they know people don't want to pay for fat. I've see packer's cut briskets in Colorado but there is enough fat on the briskets I've seen around here to do what you want to do. I usually cut most of the fat off when I'm cooking one. But I double wrap mine in foil so it doesn't dry out.

There is a brand of marinade out of Texas called "Claude's" that I bring back from Colorado. They have a "Fajita" marinade that I soak the brisket in over night. Then I put some of the dry rub that Randy Beam sells (he is/was a member of CSF and may have come over but I don't remember his handle) on it, double wrap it in foil and cook it at 250 for however long I guess it needs to cook.
 

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There is a brand of marinade out of Texas called "Claude's" that I bring back from Colorado. They have a "Fajita" marinade that I soak the brisket in over night. Then I put some of the dry rub that Randy Beam sells (he is/was a member of CSF and may have come over but I don't remember his handle) on it, double wrap it in foil and cook it at 250 for however long I guess it needs to cook.
Don, I'm here. I'm glad you like the rub.
 
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