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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Having No Deer movement in the location I normally use I decided to mix it up and relocate a hang on stand I have into a location that is just on the outskirts of thick bedding cover. The tree I picked is a great tree and I see me using it next season for sure. Its tucked away inside a shallow "U" area and gives me a great 18-30 yard shooting opportunity if a deer comes through.

Here is a view of the shooting area.


This shows the tree with some cover built in and cant be maintained if I were using a climber


Had a nanny doe and her yearling come through at 5:15 I was pumped up. Took a while for the nanny to come into my range but 10 minutes later I had a broadside shot and let my Hoyt EAT!!!

Tracking took LONG on this deer but I Just knew she was dead at how much blood I was finding.


I clocked the distance she ran from the shot and it was 100 yards exactly!

She smacked this tree and slid into HOME PLATE!


Entrance wound


Exit wound


I don't drag deer out of my this area after pulling my back badly on one last year. Gutted and Fit into my Mystery Ranch Crew Cab makes easier work walking the deer out.


Another shot of the deer in my back pack


That was super fun and put another deer in my freezer! Love it when you plan and the outcome is successful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
You killed a doe with a yearling in tow? What the hell is wrong with you?
You need educated on the life of a yearling. This young one was clearly able to live in its own. I did not say fawn and this smaller deer was in no way to small to not live on its own.

All doe during the rut kick the yearlings away and do not tend to them and are destined to fend for themselves.

I'd appreciate not being ridiculed for managing the doe population in my area wich needs a few less. I am a meat hunter and not a horn hunter. I spend a lot of time thinking about the deer I want to kill each season and do not take lightly a life taken.
 

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Good job. Nice meat deer. Fat does are the absolute best. Hint to some of you that don't meat hunt, if you shoot the doe first, sometimes the yearling will hang around and you get the two for one deal.
 

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^ that's how i got 2 with a muzzle loader. Yearlings circled around and came back... Gave me time to reload.
 

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You killed a doe with a yearling in tow? What the hell is wrong with you?
Let me help you understand so you don't have to call PETA.

This is the fall, does do not care for fawns anymore, the fawns weighs around 60-80+ pounds by November depending on the location and nutrition available. They are born in the spring.

A yearling is a year old deer, thus the term yearling. Yearling does can push 100 pounds. A buck yearling can push 140 pounds and have 2-6 points on the rack. The weight is usually based on location in the US. Here in North and South Carolina the Deer are typically smaller than the above average numbers.

A yearling is a fully capable deer, not in need of a mother!
 
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