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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Which class is less time consuming? C++ or JAVA? Next semester, I will be attempting a full course load on-line and I have to take a computer programming class. I have absolutely no interest in computer programming, and I don't believe the field I might be working in would ever even involve programming. It is simply one of the requirements for the degree. I would like to take the easier of the two so that I don't have to waste as much time on it because I will also be taking a math course, and I suck in math. So, I would rather not have other classes sucking up too much of my time.

It wouldn't be so bad if I was able to just go to school, but we are supposed to have a heavier work load this coming spring, so I expect to be not only working 10 to 12 hours shifts, I will be on the road 6 to 8 weeks out of the semester. Maybe more if they send me for more training aside from the actual work loads.
 

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Scofflaw Cyclist
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C++ and Java are basically the same. I hated Java with the fire of a thousand suns. It took me quite a bit of time outside of class to sort out Object Oriented programming. It takes a specific mindset that isn't normal. Best of luck to you, but either one of those classes is going to be difficult.
 

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Java is way more forgiving, and has a plethora of free development tools available for it (editors like Eclipse, with built-in debugging; profilers; so on) -- and lots of resources online.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I figured they would both be a pain, but when I was physically at school, I remember the guys talking about hating one or the other more than the rest. I couldn't remember which one it was though. I can't stand that programming crap. I took Introduction to Programming, and that was plenty enough for me. We had an extra credit project right after the final worth two grade points. If it wasn't for that, I would have made a C in the class.

I was actually surprised to see them offered on-line, as the other school I am enrolled at doesn't offer any of the computer courses on-line, except for introduction to computers.
 

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I've taken both.. and while I work in computers, I am not a programmer. The intro class to either one is actually pretty easy. Of the two languages I preferred C++ as it's considerably simpler at the basic level. If I remember correctly the most complex program you're going to do in an intro class is figuring out a change machine, which is just a series of loops. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I've taken both.. and while I work in computers, I am not a programmer. The intro class to either one is actually pretty easy. Of the two languages I preferred C++ as it's considerably simpler at the basic level. If I remember correctly the most complex program you're going to do in an intro class is figuring out a change machine, which is just a series of loops. :)
Ours was a pizza calculator. What I found odd is that there are no computer type class prerequisites for the Java or C++ courses.
 

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Java is easier for a first class. Although it will depend on the teacher and expectations if you just want to pass. My first class was Java as a freshman, and that was a lot easier than my C++ class the next semester.
 

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I'm an electrical engineer. I've taken LOTS of classes (more than one degree). Some in a degree program, some not. I program a good bit, in all kinds of languages, though it's NOT my primary job - it's one tool among many.

All that said...in my opinion, this is going to depend much more on how the particular class is structured, what is in it, what the intent is, and who the instructor is. If you can pick the one that does NOT do OOP (Object Oriented Programming) it will be easier. If you want to PM me with links to the class descriptions, I would be happy to give you my take on them.

A good instructor can make a hard class bearable, and maybe even useful. A poor instructor can make even an easy class miserable and useless. Is there any way you can find out anything about the profs?
 

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I agree with the staying away from OOP if you can avoid it. It works great for some things, like graphics, but for others it only complicates matters because it makes a poor fitting model. Also, it is largely based upon ideas of abstraction, which until you intuitively understand the underlying concepts, making them abstract won't make sense.
You didn't mention your field, but if it is hardware, C or C++ would be beneficial as most embedded systems are still C.

If tools are an issue, install Linux on your system as it has tools for everything, though I think the M$ tools are free now too. One thing about tools: focus on the language, not the tool. For this Linux + Vim or Emacs is a great learning environment.
 

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Programming is challenging to most people because of the way you have to think about it. Most people will tell you their first programming class was the hardest.

In my opinion after taking 3 years of C++ in high school and a semester of C++ and a semester of Java in college, run away from Java. I hate Java. C++ makes so much more sense and is easier to use on a basic level.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Programming is challenging to most people because of the way you have to think about it. Most people will tell you their first programming class was the hardest.

In my opinion after taking 3 years of C++ in high school and a semester of C++ and a semester of Java in college, run away from Java. I hate Java. C++ makes so much more sense and is easier to use on a basic level.
Is it possible you thought JAVA was more difficult because you had so much exposure to C++ already? Everyone else seems to lean towards JAVA being the way to go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'm an electrical engineer. I've taken LOTS of classes (more than one degree). Some in a degree program, some not. I program a good bit, in all kinds of languages, though it's NOT my primary job - it's one tool among many.

All that said...in my opinion, this is going to depend much more on how the particular class is structured, what is in it, what the intent is, and who the instructor is. If you can pick the one that does NOT do OOP (Object Oriented Programming) it will be easier. If you want to PM me with links to the class descriptions, I would be happy to give you my take on them.

A good instructor can make a hard class bearable, and maybe even useful. A poor instructor can make even an easy class miserable and useless. Is there any way you can find out anything about the profs?
I might be screwed. Both are utilizing object based programming.

Title
JAVA Programming
Course Section Number
CSC-151-NW1
Description
This course introduces computer programming using the JAVA programming language with object-oriented programming principles. Emphasis is placed on event-driven programming methods, including creating and manipulating objects, classes, and using object-oriented tools such as the class debugger. Upon completion students should be able to design, code, test, debug JAVA language programs. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement.
Credits
3.00
CEUs


Title
C++ Programming
Course Section Number
CSC-134-NW1
Description
This course introduces computer programming using the C++ programming language with object-oriented programming principles. Emphasis is placed on event-driven programming methods, including creating and manipulating objects, classes, and using object-oriented tools such as the class debugger. Upon completion, students should be able to design, code, test and debug at a beginning level. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement.
Credits
3.00
CEUs
 

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Premium Member
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C++ is an object oriented programming language... Doesn't necessarily mean you start with the complex stuff though.

cout << "Good luck!";

(I remember that much I think??) me != programmer
 

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You bunch of Geeks and Nerds :D ;sofa

I did the entry into C++ at community college. Not to bad. Forgot everything I learned.
 

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Premium Member
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You bunch of Geeks and Nerds :D ;sofa

I did the entry into C++ at community college. Not to bad. Forgot everything I learned.
:) Yeah, guilty!

Given those two descriptions (and note the commonality, cut-and-pasted no doubt), I would go with C++ anyway. Looks like they are more concerned with teaching the basics...if you have not had a lot of programming experience, C++ is probably easier. For me, it is easier. If you ever thought you might do web programming (your OP says not :) you might lean towards Java...

[Obligatory nerd comment: as someone who uses programming for either small embedded stuff OR heavy-duty number-crunching, BOTH of those languages suck ;sord ]

One can write C++ code using several different styles. Java is a little less flexible that way. JMO.

Oh, and the tool set: if they are using Visual Studio, that development environment is broadly used, and the project concept and tool driving is almost as important as the language...that makes the actual language choice less important...

I'm back to the instructor thing. Any way to find out who teaches which class, and are they any good?
 
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