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Before any kind of coating it's best to prep the surface by getting it smooth and clean of any previous finishes, etc. Raw metal doesn't need to be blasted but if you're coating something that has been used previously it sure doesn't hurt. 95% of any good finish is in the prep work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
When you say getting it smooth, I thought finishes took best to a porous or slightly abbrasive surface?

The reason I'm asking, the stock wheels on my Tundra have some issues with the factory finish flaking and peeling off, and I've seen some pics of the same wheels that have been powdercoated and they looked good.
I was thinking by having the coated, it would get rid of the flaking finish, and give me a new look, all at the same time.
 

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Stripped...yes. No need to blast or sand unless it's needed to remove rust or scratches and such. Bare metal and contaminant free is a must.
 

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Factory alloy wheels will have a clear coat on them. You need to remove that coating and get to the bare metal to get the best adhesion, thus the blasting. :) Smooth is a relative term, I mean an even surface. Doesn't need to be 2000 grit smooth, more like 220 for something like powdercoating if that makes sense.
 

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If the current finish is flaking it would probably be best to have it all removed. Especially to make sure the powder will adhear properly. Stripping it should be ok but I think bead blasting it or using another softer media would give more consistent finish in the end. After the part is clean up very well it needs to be decontaminated like the others have said. I have always wiped the part down the acetone. All in all powder coating is worth it. But with most every other type of top coat it will look much better and be more durable if the prep work is done well. It's not too hard of a process. My father and I have coated many parts in his garage.

Sent from my LS670 using Tapatalk
 

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So to go from these to this would take what?

I'll try to get a pic of my actual wheels to show you what I'm talking about with the finish on them.
Is this something you're going to try to do yourself...or have it done? I'f you're going to have it done then I'd let the powdercoater do the prep.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
If the current finish is flaking it would probably be best to have it all removed. Especially to make sure the powder will adhear properly. Stripping it should be ok but I think bead blasting it or using another softer media would give more consistent finish in the end. After the part is clean up very well it needs to be decontaminated like the others have said. I have always wiped the part down the acetone. All in all powder coating is worth it. But with most every other type of top coat it will look much better and be more durable if the prep work is done well. It's not too hard of a process. My father and I have coated many parts in his garage.

Sent from my LS670 using Tapatalk
This is what I was thinking. A couple of the wheels look pretty bad where a previous owner tried to fix/cover up the missing finish, and I'd like to give the powder coat route a try.

Anyone have a rough ballpark what a place would charge to PC 4 wheels?

Also, is a clear coat advised on a PCd piece? Mainly a wheel like this? I'm thinking brake dust and other elements.
 

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CeraCoat them in rhodesian.
 

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Just thought I'd throw this out there for ya. Check with Snider Tire down your way. I had six wheels for a 2005 Silverado 3500 HD Duelie powder coated by Snider up here in Greensboro. I can't remember what they charged me but I'm fairly confident it was reasonable............... Dave
 

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Most powdercoater's vary alot on pricing. I would "guess" anywhere from $50-$100 a wheel. Depending on how much prep work and what color is used. I have never had anyone coat my stuff so that is a pure guess. Could go higher depending on the shop. I have always just done it myself as long as the part fits in our stove haha. From what I've read on most shops sites, most of the cost comes from the prep work. So less prep they have to do the cheaper it will be.
 

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There should be several powdercoat shops in the Charlotte area. The best bet is to visit the shops with the wheels if possible and get several quotes. Ask to see some of their work. Prices will cary greatly. If they will be blasting the wheels, find out what they plan to use and how it is done, manually or using automation. The preparation and cure are the critical issues with powdercoating for long term durability. Make sure they use an exterior grade of powder, typically it will be some hybrid technology rather than a straight epoxy or urethane. Never use epoxy powder for exterior applications, it will not hold up. Urethane based powder is good but the hybrids are much better IMHO. A clear coat is not necessary with a black finish like you want. Clear powder top coat is sometimes used with metallic colors.

Here is one shop, I don't know anything about them just the result of a google search.

http://www.princewheels.com/powder_coating.htm

You may also want to call Sherwin-Williams in Charlotte, 704-596-4933 and talk to them about a good shop for your project. S-W sells a lot of powder through that store and should be able to give you a couple of shops to contact. Tell them Lew at CCF sent you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
There should be several powdercoat shops in the Charlotte area. The best bet is to visit the shops with the wheels if possible and get several quotes. Ask to see some of their work. Prices will cary greatly. If they will be blasting the wheels, find out what they plan to use and how it is done, manually or using automation. The preparation and cure are the critical issues with powdercoating for long term durability. Make sure they use an exterior grade of powder, typically it will be some hybrid technology rather than a straight epoxy or urethane. Never use epoxy powder for exterior applications, it will not hold up. Urethane based powder is good but the hybrids are much better IMHO. A clear coat is not necessary with a black finish like you want. Clear powder top coat is sometimes used with metallic colors.

Here is one shop, I don't know anything about them just the result of a google search.

http://www.princewheels.com/powder_coating.htm

You may also want to call Sherwin-Williams in Charlotte, 704-596-4933 and talk to them about a good shop for your project. S-W sells a lot of powder through that store and should be able to give you a couple of shops to contact. Tell them Lew at CCF sent you.
Thanks Lew, I'll look into it.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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